Difference between revisions of "X-Men: rEvolution"

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Five decades ago, mutants were barely heard of. Four decades ago, rumours of people with superhuman powers were spoken of in hushed whispers, tabloid scares, superstitious warnings. Then the scientific research of Dr. Moira MacTaggart published out of Muir Island rocketed the knowledge of the X-Gene into scientific fact, and mutants were pushed from whispered rumour into a household word. Not, to be sure, a welcome household word. As the buzz spread, from nation to nation, continent to continent, countries were widely conflicted on how to deal with the mutant issue. Issue, problem, menace, even the language used to talk about mutants was telling. While a select minority saw them as the next stage of human evolution, a growing and vocal majority called mutants a problem, a danger, a threat to the very existence of society.
 
Five decades ago, mutants were barely heard of. Four decades ago, rumours of people with superhuman powers were spoken of in hushed whispers, tabloid scares, superstitious warnings. Then the scientific research of Dr. Moira MacTaggart published out of Muir Island rocketed the knowledge of the X-Gene into scientific fact, and mutants were pushed from whispered rumour into a household word. Not, to be sure, a welcome household word. As the buzz spread, from nation to nation, continent to continent, countries were widely conflicted on how to deal with the mutant issue. Issue, problem, menace, even the language used to talk about mutants was telling. While a select minority saw them as the next stage of human evolution, a growing and vocal majority called mutants a problem, a danger, a threat to the very existence of society.
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New York City has long been a cultural hub -- of America and of the world. When it comes to mutants it is no different. In a city of millions of diverse people, it is easy -- or, at least, easier -- for a feared and hated minority to have a chance at blending in. From all over the world mutants have flocked to the city, hoping for a chance at a normal life. In the wake of Magneto and his Brotherhood of Mutants’ recent attack at Liberty Island, though, that blending in is getting harder. Anti-mutant sentiment is reaching a fever pitch. While most mutants -- and most humans -- just want to keep their heads down and live a quiet life, there are those on both sides of the fight gearing up for what they see as an enormous threat to their way of life.
 
New York City has long been a cultural hub -- of America and of the world. When it comes to mutants it is no different. In a city of millions of diverse people, it is easy -- or, at least, easier -- for a feared and hated minority to have a chance at blending in. From all over the world mutants have flocked to the city, hoping for a chance at a normal life. In the wake of Magneto and his Brotherhood of Mutants’ recent attack at Liberty Island, though, that blending in is getting harder. Anti-mutant sentiment is reaching a fever pitch. While most mutants -- and most humans -- just want to keep their heads down and live a quiet life, there are those on both sides of the fight gearing up for what they see as an enormous threat to their way of life.
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Where will you stand when the revolution hits?
 
Where will you stand when the revolution hits?
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X-Men: rEvolution is an X-Men Themed MUSH. We are currently under construction, and not yet open for play.
 
X-Men: rEvolution is an X-Men Themed MUSH. We are currently under construction, and not yet open for play.

Revision as of 17:28, 9 July 2012

Five decades ago, mutants were barely heard of. Four decades ago, rumours of people with superhuman powers were spoken of in hushed whispers, tabloid scares, superstitious warnings. Then the scientific research of Dr. Moira MacTaggart published out of Muir Island rocketed the knowledge of the X-Gene into scientific fact, and mutants were pushed from whispered rumour into a household word. Not, to be sure, a welcome household word. As the buzz spread, from nation to nation, continent to continent, countries were widely conflicted on how to deal with the mutant issue. Issue, problem, menace, even the language used to talk about mutants was telling. While a select minority saw them as the next stage of human evolution, a growing and vocal majority called mutants a problem, a danger, a threat to the very existence of society.


New York City has long been a cultural hub -- of America and of the world. When it comes to mutants it is no different. In a city of millions of diverse people, it is easy -- or, at least, easier -- for a feared and hated minority to have a chance at blending in. From all over the world mutants have flocked to the city, hoping for a chance at a normal life. In the wake of Magneto and his Brotherhood of Mutants’ recent attack at Liberty Island, though, that blending in is getting harder. Anti-mutant sentiment is reaching a fever pitch. While most mutants -- and most humans -- just want to keep their heads down and live a quiet life, there are those on both sides of the fight gearing up for what they see as an enormous threat to their way of life.


Where will you stand when the revolution hits?




X-Men: rEvolution is an X-Men Themed MUSH. We are currently under construction, and not yet open for play.